amazed

by Linda
(Calgary)

I have been trying to quit smoking cigarettes - the more I think about quitting, the more I smoke. I can't figure out why I smoke. I have a grandson who is 1 year old and I promised to quite before he was born, but just haven't been able to, as I fill up with anxiety when I think about not smoking. I just can't imagine my life if I didn't smoke - what would I do with myself. I have had thoughts that my smoking has something to do with issues from my childhood that I haven't dealt with - my dad was an alcoholic and also smoked - but I just haven't been able to figure it out. When you say in your article that addictions are related to unresolved childhood issues, I am amazed, because that sounds so much like what I think about myself. The only problem is how do I figure out what the unresolved issues are? I just don't remember any incidence that were so traumatic that I would feel abandoned or anything like that. I am 53 and do think that at this point in time I have only myself to blame for the way my life is now, I can't blame my father or mother or any other family member. But how do I get to the root of what is bothering me?

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Aug 19, 2011
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thanks!
by: Linda

Thanks so much for your comments and encouragement! I am feeling a bit more energized after finding this site and am trying not to be so hard on myself, knowing others have struggled as well. I have decided to make myself a smoking "schedule" to add some discipline to my desire to quit smoking. I am determined to leave the past where it is and not look to the past to find reasons for smoking, but rather look to the future for reasons to not smoke. I appreciate your support! Linda

Aug 16, 2011
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To Linda
by: Angie Carter

Hi Linda, There is also one other to keep in mind, nicotine addiction is extremely powerful. Research has likened it to (or put it in the same category as) opiates, that's how powerful it is.
I like the comment made earlier that it was a behavior that was modeled to you while growing up. That certainly plays a part in what we do as we get older. There are several factors that contribute to addicitive behavior and environment can be one of them.
I quite smoking right after I got sober. All I can share with you is that at one point I thought I was going to go crazy. It was one of the hardest things I ever did. I used every resource available to me as far as recovery tools (same ones I used for my alcohol and drug addiction) I prayed, talked to people, worked the steps on it, wrote in my journal and used some good old fashion stubbornness and determination!
Hang in there and take it one day at at time and know that it IS possible to quit. Utilize anything at your disposal to help you.
Good Luck! Angie Carter

Aug 15, 2011
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Age 1 to 6 years
by: Anonymous

I don't think you necessarily have to have had a tramatic experience in early childhood to have developed a tendancy towards smoking..During the period of 1 to 6 years of age you take on the programing of the people who are caring for you.. Mainly your parents and if they modeled smoking to you as a child, you likely have a subconsicous pattern set. To change this pattern it will take developing new subconsious habits so that your subconsious mind takes over and you stop smoking. All the more reason to keep listening to the program Don offers and allow your subconsious mind to accept new thought patterns.

Aug 15, 2011
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Hi
by: Anonymous

Hi, why don't u try electronic cigarettes?

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